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Yes my little Futurists, I realize that I reblog a lot (but the blog posts are sometimes astounding) so I thought I’d rip something that I think is a cute and quick and a tiny poll that is also interesting.

So, here’s the question:

What do you write with?

A fountain

pen

pencil

A computer

A typewriter

A ballpoint pen

Other:

The other can be several choices in one if you’re like me and write with whatever you can grab!

Waking Writer

The brede chroniclesHalf-human Alekzander Brede is a law unto himself…or so he thinks. Elektra Tate, the street orphan who loves him has other ideas. 

When she betrays him for no apparent reason, he vows to punish her one way or another. Taking the one thing she treasures most—their son—begins a cat and mouse relationship spanning two planets and costing possibly his life. Elektra will stop at nothing to save her son but can she overcome Brede’s twisted idea of vengeance?

Buy your copy and follow the author, P.I. Barrington, on Twitter and Facebook!

Amazon Book Link | Facebook | Twitter | Official Site


ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

After a decade-long detour through the entertainment industry, P.I. Barrington has returned to fiction author. She has experience in journalism, radio air talent and the music industry. P.I. lives in Southern California and, at times, co-authors with her sister, Loni Emmert who also works in…

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What genre do YOU write?

The Writers in Residence

Reading and Writing – The Basics by Kate ThorntonKate Thornton is a retired US Army officer who enjoys writing both mysteries and science fiction. With over 100 short stories in print, she teaches a short story class and is currently working on a series of romantic suspense novels. She divides her time between Southern California and Tucson, Arizona.

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I write Mystery and Science fiction.

I used to say, I write short stories. And while I do indeed still write short stories, I also write novels.

We tend to identify ourselves by the most comfortable label, or by the one we’d like to fit, as well as by the one that seems to fit the best, based on what we have actually written. Or maybe just by what we wish we could write: “Yes, I write archaeological papers with a bit of whimsy,” or “Yes, I write about the cosmological implications of French cooking.”

So I have identified…

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I’m back.  In a manner of speaking that is.  I’m in a place where my office is as big as a living room and I have an upstairs and while I keep trying to hate it, I can’t. I just can’t. This after being dead and coming back, months in rehab, and finally being dragged back and forth across this country puppies ferried around as well. (Let me tell you, Oklahoma has THE most impressive dog park/rest stop ever!)

So I decided to break the silence, a least for my people here on FI and yes, if you’re reading this consider yourself thus,  and tell you that’s the reason for the silence for so long.  I’ve barely had two seconds to communicate anything to anyone and finally I am able to take a miniscule breath after realizing I have no soda anywhere near me so I’m forced to drink diet Cranberry juice (kind of good with no acidic tang) as I remember leaving the only place I’ve ever known in my life.

Oh, I prepared for it. In fact I’ve spent the last five years preparing for it, looking at the house and property I lived in for over forty (yes 40) years, trying to burn a hole in my retinas and my memory  so that I would never forget the hellish/sometimes astonishing life I would leave forever. I drove past my childhood houses trying to remember them but I only have memories that are fleeting and intense since the neighborhoods and the houses have deteriorated or been torn down for new, cookie cutter residential districts. Believe me when you expect to never leave and have built your whole life around a place/lifestyle/dreams (starting to sound like Stevie Nicks here) leaving is the hardest concept to accept.Leaving and never coming back? Damn near impossible. 

I always expected to die in Los Angeles. In fact I did. In 2015 two weeks before my birthday I suffered a full-on cardiac arrest (not a heart attack) and died literally on my living room floor in front of the computer, my mom and two hysterical puppies. When I woke up fully from the resulting coma I was in a rehab hospital. It wasn’t traumatic for me (I told my sister who was traumatized, that it reminded me of the Seinfeld episode where Kramer sees the entire movie about the woman who wakes up from a coma & says ‘Oh, Doctor, I feel so refreshed!’) but it was for my entire family and friends who got all of their friends to pray for me; we’re talking a mass in Rome for me 5,000 people there, friends who belong to giant churches of 1,000 or more parishioners (and not all Catholic either) to people on my cousin’s radio show (God only knows how many people that request  reached) and finally on my social media. Why any of these people would pray for me, I have no idea. I’m bitchy, arrogant, and nothing close to a saint.

And yet God does have a sense of humor. Okay, a sardonic, dark sense of humor but a sense of humor nonetheless. I DID die in California. He brought me back. (I think all those people praying for me must have driven Him insane and He caved.) Be careful what you ask for, it isn’t a joke my friends.

I did lose it once. As the plane banked from LAX and over the Pacific I looked out the window and cried. It was the first time leaving was a reality for me and I just lost it. I was exhausted from the flight–no Xanax this time–actually I was exhausted from the fear of flying and looked wearily at my new home. It took a few days to get oriented to both the house and the time change (still haven’t gotten over that) but every time I expected to hate something about everything here, I loved it instead. I don’t even miss Cali. Not the least little bit.

Very funny God, very funny.

 

 

 

Source: Authors to Read: SciFi/Fantasy

I’m no brain surgeon so when the subject of technology and physics terminology and logic popped up on one of my Facebook writing groups yesterday I read a lot of the posts and commented where I could. I was happily surprised that there are a few other authors like me who don’t go into the hard science perspective, preferring to focus on relationships (sometimes I can’t help it, my first publisher was a romance publisher) in a futuristic society complete with aliens (think Katy Perry’s song ET here).

I suddenly realized that there are two different camps in sci-fi: hard science and what some wonderful author called “low-tech” sci-fi (if you are her or know her, please connect us so I can proceed to give her credit due) which I think fits my level of sci-in-the-fi. In any case, I love the term. Many of those authors on the group give effort to trying to keep the science and physics correct which I love them for; I posted that while I love reading hard science, I’m not qualified to write it. But I do love semi-military sci-fi just because I dig giant alien killing or scorching big guns. So, what’s a low-tech science fiction author to do?

Well, I think that doing/showing/exposition should be done…simply. What I do is try to describe the ship, what I would like to see in/on it. Now, it’s a bit difficult for me to picture highly developed aliens who can travel across galaxies not having the wherewithal to include some nice, luxurious accouterments. That is unless they closely resemble the alien in Alien the movie, in which case their body structure is so different from us that hanging upside down is a way of sleeping rather than a spine stretch. Oh, and also if the character or characters are supplied ships via their military or are self-employed and dare I say it poor. Now that it is possible Mars had water and possibly life forms and similar environment to our own, it might not be so far-fetched that they might have similar physical and mental evolutions. Again, cue the ET song. My only hope is they don’t look like what one reporter called the “Spoonhead” aliens in Close Encounters.

So I like to think that my readers might think like I do: girls can carry big guns and have alien boyfriends and all aliens are not rich in the traditional sense. They have to work too otherwise a relationship is going to suffer in some way or another. And just because the aliens do not believe in or have any type of religious structures, they can understand the concept of “giving” whether it’s selfless or not, and can have a sense of fairness and justice in one way or another. Just maybe not our sense of justice.

Take Alekzander Brede for example. He cares absolutely nothing at all for what humans, even in their dystopian society, consider priceless: gold. What matters to him is physical power instead. On the other hand, Elektra Tate who worships him would love to have anything that could pass as money just to eat.  He makes his own justice and has no compunction against killing anyone for any reason most of the time just because he can. His size and physical strength dwarfing humans makes no one question him and pretty much everyone to avoid him to remain alive. Only Elektra is fairly safe and I mean fairly safe.

But again, I don’t go too much into the hard science factors. And, if I do, like I posted, I use what little science I’m familiar with–not in the Brede Chronicles–but in other series where I’ve used DNA evidence in unusual ways. But I try to simplify it so it’s not too daunting and is interesting to a reader. Like I posted it’s all about relationships. Why is that? Because what good is a book or story if humans can’t relate to it? And at this point, aliens are all conjecture.

I think if you’re writing commercial sci-fi you’ve got to make it comfortable and understandable to your audience. If you introduce something too strange or even just difficult to think about, you’re going to lose readers. And Lord knows that one of the last things an author wants.

That’s the lecture for tonight.

Good Night my little Imperfections!

Reblogged on WordPress.com

Source: A Short, Honest Treatment of a Serious and Real Problem — J.A. Owenby’s “Tears in the Sun”

Source: Authors to Read: SciFi/Fantasy

There’s a new contest in town! Well, not new exactly–it’s the 20th anniversary of the Lucky Agent contest! Check out the info below to read and participate:

http://tinyurl.com/q2wdw2u or check out this tweet:

New FREE contest for writers of Romance and Romantic New Adult http://tinyurl.com/nz6n2p8 Judged by agent @mcorvisiero, via @chucksambuchino

Good luck and happy writing!

Authors! Some info for your research…readers interesting info.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

1. This map shows the world divided into 7 sections (each with a distinct colour) with each section containing 1 billion people.

 


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2. This map shows (in white) where 98 percent of Australia ‘s population lives.




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3. It may not come as a surprise but more people live inside the circle than outside of it.




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4. This map shows what is on the other side of the world from where you are standing.  For the most part it will probably be water.


 


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5. Apparently you can’t get Big Macs everywhere.  This map shows (in red) the countries that have McDonalds.


 


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6. This map shows the countries (in blue) where people drive on the left side of the road.


 


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7. This map shows countries (in white) that England has never invaded.  There are only 22 of them.


 


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8. The line in this map shows all of the world’s Internet connections in…

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I thought it was funny.

Joanne Guidoccio

While fishing, three men catch a mermaid who begs to be set free in return for granting each of them a wish.

The first man shakes his head and says, “Okay, if you can really grant wishes, then double my IQ.”

The mermaid says, “Done.”

Suddenly, the man starts reciting Shakespeare flawlessly.

The second man is so amazed, he says to the mermaid, “Triple my IQ.”

The mermaid says, “Done.”

The man starts to spout out all the mathematical solutions to problems that have been stumping the scientists.

Impressed, the third man decides to one-up his friends. “Quintuple my IQ.”

The mermaid looks at him and says, “You know, I don’t usually try to change people’s minds when they make a wish, but I really wish that you would reconsider.”

The man is adamant. “No, I want you to increase my IQ times five, and if you don’t do it…

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